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Ivy Bridge Heat Issues solved?

Post Date: 2012-05-13

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JaqenHgar View Drop Down
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  Quote JaqenHgar Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Topic: Ivy Bridge Heat Issues solved?
    Posted: 13 May 2012 at 9:07pm
Found this article that points to the integrated thermal paste in the i7 3770K as the source of the heat issues.  Check it out, food for thought. 

http://uk.hardware.info/news/27716/ivy-bridge-heat-issue-indeed-caused-by-thermal-paste
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josephlee View Drop Down
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  Quote josephlee Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 6:52am
Interesting indeed.
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  Quote cusafr Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 7:15am
Also an article at Maximum PC.  I am a little concerned now!  Just ordered my new system.  Should I have waited?  Is this a REAL problem?  Do you think Intel or Digital Storm will do something to correct the problem in the future?

Here is part of the article*********

After a ton of speculation, a bit of denial, and a ton of testing we finally have our answer. The thermal interface material change made by Intel when it went from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge is indeed the cause of the excessive temperatures we’ve observed while overclocking. The first accusation was made in late-April by Overclockers.com, however proving it wasn’t easy. The Japanese division of PC Watch somehow managed to remove the integrated heat spreader from a Core i7 3770k, along with the stock binding and grease. They then proceed to replace it with aftermarket alternatives, and the results speak for themselves.

The findings are undisputable. By swapping out the TIM with OCZ Freeze and Coolaboratory Liquid Pro, they were able to lower the temperatures by up to 18% off a stock clocked chip, and a whopping 23% when overclocked from 3.5GHz to 4GHz. Chips with the aftermarket TIM were also able to sustain higher core voltages, which of course will lead to better overclocking potential.

The report concludes that Intel’s decision to move away from the fluxless solder used in Sandy Bridge has unfortunately crippled the overclocking potential of this generation of CPU’s. Its possible Intel may eventually change the design back, however with AMD lagging pretty far behind these days they really don’t have much incentive to do so. Enthusiasts really only have one place to shop for CPU’s these days.

Ivy Bridge is still an amazing push forward performance wise, it’s just unfortunate that the potential for even more is there and we can’t get at it.


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Asangard View Drop Down
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  Quote Asangard Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 8:22am
The real issue with the heat comes from increasing the voltage.  The Ivy Bridge CPUs don't like increased voltage because of the TIM used but can be OCed at much lower voltages than the previous Sandy Bridge CPUs.  I even read one review where they acheived an OC of 4.5Ghz without increasing the voltage at all.  The sweet spot for voltage seems to be in the 1.1 to 1.2 volt range.  The staff at DS are experts in OCing and I don't see this as a problem.
They should be able to achieve stable OCs at significantly lower voltages and stay within acceptable temps for the CPU. 
 
ON a side note I emailed Alex reviews from Overclockers and Anandtech detailing this issue back on the 30th of March.
 
Here are the links to both articles:
 
Eventhough they blame the heat on "Intel using TIM paste between the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) and the CPU die on Ivy Bridge chips, instead of fluxless solder".  They also point out you can get remarkably good OCs at lower volt settings while staying within exceptable temps.
 
The Ivy Bridge CPUs are a different beast when it comes to OCing them.  Once again DS has the experience in OCing so I don't believe there is anything to worry about here.
 
Will Intel address this issue and change their process and go back to the fluxless solder or use a different TIM paste?  Who knows.  I can find no indication that Intel is considering such a move. 
 
With the ability to OC the Ivy Bridge Chips at significantly lower voltages I think the heat issue is a moot point.
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  Quote Traxstar Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 10:34am
i dont think its solved since my comp has been in stage 5 for over a week due to the fan and cooling system crappin out or something
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JaqenHgar View Drop Down
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  Quote JaqenHgar Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 8:01pm
I wonder if DS would swap out the TIM paste for a higher quality compound like this quote from the above article suggests:  "By swapping out the TIM with OCZ Freeze and Coolaboratory Liquid Pro, they were able to lower the temperatures by up to 18% off a stock clocked chip, and a whopping 23% when overclocked from 3.5GHz to 4GHz". 
       A 23% decrease in temp is always a good thing, even if the temps are not that high.  I want run my system as cool as possible without breaking the bank on an expensive LC solution.  If some $12 thermal paste can achieve those results, I think the option should be on the table.
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  Quote Krav_Mind Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 8:09pm
I am thinking the same thing. Whats the word Alex?
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Alex View Drop Down
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  Quote Alex Quote  Post ReplyReply bullet Posted: 14 May 2012 at 9:39pm

Intel has changed the way they connect the CPU heat spreader to the actual cores, however, that is not a defect or a real issue. In all honesty, the CPUs run at what Intel says they will and they do have headroom for overclocking. We've been overclocking the CPUs and shipping systems for a while now, there is nothing to worry about.

 
The Ivy Bridge CPUs use less voltage to get the same overclock a 4.5GHz on Sandy Bridge. This is where the heat difference comes in.
 
Ivy Bridge CPUs don't overclock as well as Sandy Bridge, but, a juicy 4.5GHz is still easy to do.
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